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damp problem
04/01/2014
1:29 pm
twink
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Hi Ive recently experienced a damp problem in one of my properties that ive not come up against before and i wonder if any members could offer a solution. The house is an end terace property with a single occupant (alady in her early sixties who is very houseproud, Im telling you this just to show shes not a young single mum drying washing on the rads or anything). Ive recently had a band of damp appear on the party wall which is about 300mm wide and starts about a metre from the floor and finishes at 12-1300mm from FFL. It has only appeared in the last couple of months and coincidentally or otherwise the house next door has been empty and up for sale since summer. Ive had a couple of builders look at it and one suggests rising damp but cant explain why its not showing below the 1 metre line. He wants to strip the wall of plaster down to the floor, reinstall a damp course, and replaster with a new type of plaster, The other suggested that it could be caused by condensation, with the house next door being empty and therefore colder than mine the warm moist air in my house was settling on the cold wall. He suggests dry lining the wall with insulated board and scimming, but if hes wrong there would still be a damp wall behind the new wall board. Either way the cure is going to be disruptive to the tenant and costly so I would like to hear any other opinions before i get my wallet out. (or can anybody recommend a damp proofing company in the stoke area who offer a comprehensive insurance backed guarantee and charges reasonable rates! 

04/01/2014
1:59 pm
Paul Routledge
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Twink,

Can you give us a picture of the wall and surrounding room area? and send it to me a enquiries@landlordreferencing.co.uk

Is the damp patch on the wall where a shared chimney may have been in the past? As this is a usual problem of a damp patch just appearing in the middle of a flat uninterrupted wall and especially if the chimney has not been capped properly and the void filled with old building materials

Rising damp does not start in the middle of a wall it starts at the bottom hence the term “Rising”, if it is around a window it may be the sealing and in this bad weather has let water pass across the frame into the inner walls (Depends on the structure and how old the house is). It may also be condensation within the room that has found a cold spot on the wall and has cooled at that spot.

Can you send us some pictures and descriptions over and we will try and help further however dry lining a wall without using a Oldroyd type cavity product and the relevant plugging to stop contamination from the outer wall to the inner wall will  last about as long as it takes for the builder to cash your cheque.Laugh

Principally it could be anything but rising damp sounds a bit OTT unless your skirting is rotten and the plaster falling away from the walls..

04/01/2014
2:17 pm
Mary Latham
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It might be worth asking for a viewing on the property next door so that you can look to see if the same band of damp appears there too?  You may spot the cause of the damp because it is odd that it has only happened since the property next door was empty and is probably not a coincidence.  Good luck

 

 

 

 

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05/01/2014
3:39 pm
twink
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Mary Latham said
It might be worth asking for a viewing on the property next door so that you can look to see if the same band of damp appears there too?  You may spot the cause of the damp because it is odd that it has only happened since the property next door was empty and is probably not a coincidence.  Good luck
 
 
 
 
Follow me on Twitter@landlordtweets  
The perfect present for property investors @ £4.64. My book, where I warn about the storm clouds that are gathering for landlords is available on Amazon title.  Property For Rent – Investing in the UK: Will You Survive the Mayhem?  http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1484855337

Hi Thanks for the input. I am going to arrange a viewing of next door, if only to see that they have the same problem.

05/01/2014
3:49 pm
twink
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Paul Routledge said
Twink,
Can you give us a picture of the wall and surrounding room area? and send it to me a enquiries@landlordreferencing.co.uk
Is the damp patch on the wall where a shared chimney may have been in the past? As this is a usual problem of a damp patch just appearing in the middle of a flat uninterrupted wall and especially if the chimney has not been capped properly and the void filled with old building materials
Rising damp does not start in the middle of a wall it starts at the bottom hence the term “Rising”, if it is around a window it may be the sealing and in this bad weather has let water pass across the frame into the inner walls (Depends on the structure and how old the house is). It may also be condensation within the room that has found a cold spot on the wall and has cooled at that spot.
Can you send us some pictures and descriptions over and we will try and help further however dry lining a wall without using a Oldroyd type cavity product and the relevant plugging to stop contamination from the outer wall to the inner wall will  last about as long as it takes for the builder to cash your cheque.<img
title=”Laugh” alt=”Laugh” src=”http://www.landlordreferencing.co.uk/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/forum-smileys/sf-laugh.gif” />
Principally it could be anything but rising damp sounds a bit OTT unless your skirting is rotten and the plaster falling away from the walls..

Hi. I will take some pictures next week and forward to you. Ive lent the tenant a dehumidifier to see if that helps, and also to see what volume of water is collected. Regarding the comment about the chimney or window, there is none, its just a standard party wall. The house had an injected damp course in it when I bought it but theres no paperwork available so I dont know if the party wall was treated. It did occur to me that the wall had been rendered up from the floor 1 meter and this is why the damp is not showing below, but it does seem high for rising damp. The skirtings are fine. I am going to arrange a viewing for next door so that may throw more light on it and i will keep you informed.

05/01/2014
4:15 pm
Paul Routledge
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I still wonder if it was the removal of an old chimney with a shared flue and that’s why there is new render there between the party wall, how old is the house and can you take a picture of the outside and the two properties alongside one another.

You would not treat a party wall with damp injection as there would be no exterior penetrating damp the only thing it may have would be a run of DPC if it were load bearing and had a foundation underneath it and again if that were missing you would have rising damp and you skiryins and the lower part of the wall would be first to be effected.

My hunch is it is coming in from above and either down an old flue or within a cavity which has a tie running towards you wall and therefore is catching water droplet and wetting the wall around the cavity mid wall.

What is in the loft on that wall as I have even seen a bathroom vented into a loft before and condensation has cooled and run along a joist and down the inner party wall creating mould in the room below?, I have also seen a boiler sited in a loft and the condensate pipe did the same thing. Is it above the airing cupboard or a bathroom? 

 

 

06/01/2014
4:21 am
PaulBarrett
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Bizarrely I have exactly the same problem with a damp patch 1 m up the  party wall.Semi detached terrace property

I am at a loss as to what it is.

I might be having an insurance claim for a trace and investigate.

But I reckon Paul’s chimney idea is a strong cause.

I’ll have to check with the neighbour.

 

03/02/2014
8:08 pm
WendyWhite
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I’ve got a damp problem also in 2 properties. 

 

I think the first was due to the loft lagging being taken right out to the edge of the eaves.  This has now been taken back to within the wall space so hopefully that will do the trick.  Anti mould paint has also been applied around the windows and nothing has come back yet.  A new problem is the lounge wall below the window which has become covered in mould.  I’ve owned the property for 10 years and it’s never happened before so I’m baffled.  The outside walls are going to be painted with a sealant to see if that stops it. I’ve had it confirmed that it is definitely not rising damp.

 

The second house is around the windows in 2 of the bedrooms and the bathroom.  I think these are down to condensation and hot water steam and I’ve asked the tenant to open the windows after showers and baths but she doesn’t see why she should because it will cost her extra money to keep the place heated.  Instead she wants me to put a fan in the bathroom (surely this will cost her extra money to run also?) and find a magic solution to the other windows.  I’m sending someone round to have a look for a second opinion but I feel if the tenant won’t meet me half way then any remedial work done now will just be a waste of time (and money) because the same thing’s going to happen in a few months.

 

Could it be the excessive wet weather we are experiencing has exacerbated these problems?

 

 

 

04/02/2014
4:05 am
zipster31
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twink said
Hi Ive recently experienced a damp problem in one of my properties that ive not come up against before and i wonder if any members could offer a solution. The house is an end terace property with a single occupant (alady in her early sixties who is very houseproud, Im telling you this just to show shes not a young single mum drying washing on the rads or anything). Ive recently had a band of damp appear on the party wall which is about 300mm wide and starts about a metre from the floor and finishes at 12-1300mm from FFL. It has only appeared in the last couple of months and coincidentally or otherwise the house next door has been empty and up for sale since summer. Ive had a couple of builders look at it and one suggests rising damp but cant explain why its not showing below the 1 metre line. He wants to strip the wall of plaster down to the floor, reinstall a damp course, and replaster with a new type of plaster, The other suggested that it could be caused by condensation, with the house next door being empty and therefore colder than mine the warm moist air in my house was settling on the cold wall. He suggests dry lining the wall with insulated board and scimming, but if hes wrong there would still be a damp wall behind the new wall board. Either way the cure is going to be disruptive to the tenant and costly so I would like to hear any other opinions before i get my wallet out. (or can anybody recommend a damp proofing company in the stoke area who offer a comprehensive insurance backed guarantee and charges reasonable rates! 

Hi Twink, please don’t waste your money on the builders – it will not solve your problem. It won’t be condensation from next door as your side would still be dry as you have a heated property. You have water coming from somewhere – if next door has been unoccupied all winter then a frozen/burst pipe is a possibility. You may well have a water pipe running up/inside your wall or next door’s wall –  heating pipes and cold water supply to catch tanks in the loft are often buried in party walls (I have one in mine – built 1929). Buy or borrow a pipe/cable detector, I bought one off fleabay for about £15 I think, and works fine. It will find any pipes in your wall and next door when you visit. 300mm wide sounds like a leaking pipe to me. Once you have found the problem and stopped it, allow the wall to dry naturally give it as long as it takes, maybe a few weeks or a month (don’t use a dehumidifier as will help the plaster “blow” from the wall.) Once dried, paint with a decent stain blocker, then paint on top. No need to start hacking plaster off (unless plaster has “blown” badly and may fall off) or covering up with dry-lining (what a bodge!). Good luck, let us know what you find next door and don’t be taken in by builders after a quick buck.

04/02/2014
4:25 am
zipster31
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WendyWhite said
I’ve got a damp problem also in 2 properties. 

 

I think the first was due to the loft lagging being taken right out to the edge of the eaves.  This has now been taken back to within the wall space so hopefully that will do the trick.  Anti mould paint has also been applied around the windows and nothing has come back yet.  A new problem is the lounge wall below the window which has become covered in mould.  I’ve owned the property for 10 years and it’s never happened before so I’m baffled.  The outside walls are going to be painted with a sealant to see if that stops it. I’ve had it confirmed that it is definitely not rising damp.

 

The second house is around the windows in 2 of the bedrooms and the bathroom.  I think these are down to condensation and hot water steam and I’ve asked the tenant to open the windows after showers and baths but she doesn’t see why she should because it will cost her extra money to keep the place heated.  Instead she wants me to put a fan in the bathroom (surely this will cost her extra money to run also?) and find a magic solution to the other windows.  I’m sending someone round to have a look for a second opinion but I feel if the tenant won’t meet me half way then any remedial work done now will just be a waste of time (and money) because the same thing’s going to happen in a few months.

 

Could it be the excessive wet weather we are experiencing has exacerbated these problems?

 

 
Wendy – ref your first house, I would never seal an outside wall. The wall will not be able to breath and you will trap the water in the wall. Always find the source of the water ingress first, stop it, dry the wall out, then apply anti mould paint etc. Otherwise you may just be masking a problem for now. 

  Ref the second house, if the heating is not on enough and there is not enough ventilation, you will have mould all over the place, beginning in the colder areas (around windows) and on ceilings (condensating steam in bathrooms). An extractor fan connected to a humidistat in the bathroom is a good investment for you. It will protect your walls and ceiling and the tenant pays the electric to run it (which is barely noticeable). Make sure you use acrylic based paint on bathroom ceiling especially if you have a shower. If not, paint will peel. The weather is not to blame at all, if the conditions are not correct in a property, you will have mould, regardless of the current deluge.

04/02/2014
2:34 pm
Amy
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Had a LL and Maintenance Company meeting last week.

One of the LL that I met phoned me this morning. She has a flat that she has rented out for years.No problems.

New tenants phoned and complained about damp and mold.  I passed her onto my builder “he who knows all things and damp control merchant’ It turns out she had tumble dryer, not vented and all windows closed. Refuses to believe its her own fault.  

LL is putting those little air things into windows and told her to vent tublair & see how it goes. 

There should be a law making them vent and open windows. Penalised by a fine. Laugh

04/02/2014
3:35 pm
Jo Chapman
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I had an identical problem in one of my properties and the next door property has been empty long term. Initially I did what your builder suggested, stripped all the plaster back, damp proofed re rendered and skimmed. I did question at the time how this would stop the damp as it did not start at the floor so could not be rising damp but then what do I know! The problem was back within 12 months. I finally solved the problem myself by latting the walls with polythene behind and reboarding with foil backed plasterboard then re skimming. It was a pain but only cost the materials as I did the work myself. There is no sign of any damp now 18 months down the line and the property next door is still empty.

02/12/2017
11:52 am
Raju
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twink said
Hi Ive recently experienced a damp problem in one of my properties that ive not come up against before and i wonder if any members could offer a solution. The house is an end terace property with a single occupant (alady in her early sixties who is very houseproud, Im telling you this just to show shes not a young single mum drying washing on the rads or anything). Ive recently had a band of damp appear on the party wall which is about 300mm wide and starts about a metre from the floor and finishes at 12-1300mm from FFL. It has only appeared in the last couple of months and coincidentally or otherwise the house next door has been empty and up for sale since summer. Ive had a couple of builders look at it and one suggests rising damp but cant explain why its not showing below the 1 metre line. He wants to strip the wall of plaster down to the floor, reinstall a damp course, and replaster with a new type of plaster, The other suggested that it could be caused by condensation, with the house next door being empty and therefore colder than mine the warm moist air in my house was settling on the cold wall. He suggests dry lining the wall with insulated board and scimming, but if hes wrong there would still be a damp wall behind the new wall board. Either way the cure is going to be disruptive to the tenant and costly so I would like to hear any other opinions before i get my wallet out. (or can anybody recommend a damp proofing company in the stoke area who offer a comprehensive insurance backed guarantee and charges reasonable rates!   

I agree with the second view with other house being empty is causing damp on your property but would be great to have a photo to identify more on what is causing the issues.

if you would like to understand the damp issues a bit, here is a cracker post that talks through symptoms and remedies as well.

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